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The Who Live At Hull 1970 (2013)

thewholiveathull1970cover1-1360266083From rockguitardaily.blogspot.com

Pete Townshend never quite gets his due – maybe because for whatever complicated reasons, he often comes across as an unmitigated ass. I get it, believe me, there have been times when I wanted to hate everything he did, just because he came off as such an insufferable twat. However. He’s also as great an artist as rock has known.

Live At Hull 1970 is the long lost and unloved sibling of Live At Leeds, but while both have their benefits, I am here to tell you that this is one of the best live documents I’ve ever heard. Keith Moon sounds like God’s drummer on this record (which Pete may interpret as a demotion) and Townshend’s guitar tracks are sublime – if there is a better guitar tone primer than that of the second disc (the Tommy set), I’ve never heard it. Moon’s drums sound perfect, but more importantly, his performance is transcendent – truly one of rock’s greatest.

Much has been made of the fact that the bass tracks for the first four songs were lost and replaced by Leeds tracks, but if you didn’t know, you’d never know, and while I wish I hadn’t been told this, it really doesn’t matter. Again, the real point is that this is an amazing live set from one of the best rock band’s in history, and a must own by any measure.

By 1970, The Who were a fearless live band, brave enough to kick off their shows with a song sung by their bassist, and Heaven and Hell is far from a commercial tune. It is, however, brash, brilliant, and a fiery set starter. Can’t Explain follows and this is a Townshend/Moon manifesto. A close listen will reveal that the rhythmic flourishes provided by the two are why every cover of this classic comes across as dull and lifeless. Entwistle’s bass is exceptional as always, regardless of where it came from, and Roger Daltrey is a singer who’s greatness is so well known that sometimes we take him for granted.

Fortune Teller is another deep catalogue favorite, and with it’s staccato rhythms and Beatles-esque harmonies it’s another brave choice for early in the set. Pete switches gears rapidly, going from pristinely clean arpeggios to slamming power chords, and back again. Tattoo was forty years ahead of its time, explaining tattoo culture way ahead of its later arrival. The sophistication of the band is incredibly evident, and they segue from pop to proto-metal without a blink. One of my favorite Who tunes.

Young Man Blues, and Substitute slam past brilliantly like freight trains, and then it’s Happy Jack – one of rock’s great moments and the only difficulty is for me to figure out which band member is shining most brilliantly. It’s a toss up, but Moon? Holy hell, this set is the best Moon I’ve ever heard. Same with I’m A Boy – simple pop tune? Nope. Brilliantly written, conceived and performed rock miracle? Yup.

A Quick One, While He’s Away is more sheer Townshend brilliance, and his guitar playing and sound are magnificent. By now Townshend had shed any desire to be an R&B/pop hitmaker, and he’s into intricate operettas. I hate to beat a dead drum, but Moon is again beyond friggin’ fabulous, and Entwistle’s loping basslines create the perfect pad from which to launch Pete’s awesome strumming. Pete’s as good a rhythm player as Keith and John Lennon – cool thing is they all play completely differently. What was in the English water supply post WWII?

Muscular rock closes out CD one with Summertime Blues, Shakin’ All Over, and one of the greatest 15 minutes of sheer rock bliss I’ve ever heard, a truly mind bending My Generation that stops and visits See Me, Feel Me, and a few other Tommy reprisals, before Pete Townshend goes off on a guitar tangent that in my estimable opinion should sit next to Hendrix’s Machine Gun as an archetypal rock performance – this track is easily worth the price of the set, and every person who loves rock should own this. It’s actually the final track of the night, and I wish they had stayed chronologically correct here. It is maybe the ultimate set closer, maybe even more so than the set closing Magic Bus from Leeds.

CD 2 is the whole of Tommy, and for my money, this is the only version to which I shall most likely ever again listen. Townshend’s genius is presented in preposterously large fashion – strummed, picked, sang, and slung across the stage in a fashion never repeated by any guitarist. I don’t know that any rock guitarist ever had a better hour. The range of his repertoire is what is commonly called, a vocabulary. The dynamic expanse of his emotional and sophisticated composition is astounding. I wish I could give this to you as an assignment, just to make sure you understand just how great rock can be. I don’t mean to sound condescending, or authoritarian, but this is just so damned powerful, and good.

Like I said at the beginning, Townshend sometimes doesn’t get his due, but this sure makes the case. He is as great a musician as we have known – a masterful writer, player, singer, and a practically unparalleled conceptualist, who just happened to be in a band with three other gentlemen who were as good as any at their jobs.

Live At Hull 1970 is a tremendous addition to The Who’s catalogue, and even if you own, love, and swear on Live At Leeds, this is equally essential, and again, for my money, I’ve never heard Moon and Townshend better in sheer sonic terms.

January 3, 2014 Posted by | The Who Live At Hull 1970 | | Leave a comment

The Who ‘Live at Hull’- Monday 16th February 1970 By Malcolm Holt

From thisisull.com

tommyI know that it has taken a long time to write a gig review from over 38 years ago, but rest assured that the memories are just as vivid now as they were back then. I was a young 17 year old and I spent 15s (that’s 75p in real money) to see The Who perform Tommy live at Hull City Hall on 15 February 1970.

The Who had released the double album in May 1969. It was the story of a ‘deaf, dumb, and blind boy’ and was the first piece of work to be called a rock opera.
The band featured the classic line-up of Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend, John Entwistle, and Keith Moon. Tommy was of course sold on vinyl in those days and being a double album, it featured four playable sides.

2The Who had embarked on a world tour to promote the album and during August 1969 they performed at the Woodstock music festival. This was not without controversy, with the band allegedly only agreeing to appear after being paid. Their set was interrupted by activist Abbie Hoffman trying to give an impromptu speech before being persuaded to leave the stage by Townshend.
The set ended with Townshend throwing his battered Gibson SG into the crowd where it was caught by a guy called Kurt Pfeiffer. Apparently the guitar was later retrieved by a roadie for salvage. Townshend’s guitars were regularly retrieved and repaired for future use.

When the band returned to England at the end of 1969, they wanted to release a live album from the tour. They had no desire to sift through endless hours of recordings to find the best bits and it was rumoured that Townshend actually destroyed the tapes to prevent bootleggers making a fortune. However, Roger Daltrey later stated that this was not true. Instead the band decided to record two specific gigs for the planned live album and these were Leeds University and Hull City Hall.

3The gig at Hull City Hall was absolutely awesome, with Daltrey swinging his microphone with venom, Townshend showing off his windmill style of guitar playing, Entwistle looking as cool as ever, and Moon drumming like a man possessed. The noise was the loudest I had ever experienced.

They took us through the drama that was Tommy and threw in the classics Substitute, Summertime Blues, My Generation, and Magic Bus.
Photograph by Chris McCourt
For those younger readers, you will not find Who tracks called See me, feel me and Listening to you, they are parts of the song We’re Not Gonna Take It.

To the subsequent dismay of everyone living in Hull, it was later reported that there had been ‘technical problems’ with the recording at the City Hall. It was announced that the bass playing had not been recorded, due to some wiring slip-up, so the Leeds gig would be used for the live album instead

The band members themselves had agreed that the acoustics in the City Hall were superior, but they had no choice but to use the Leeds recording.

4The Who’s Live At Leeds album was released in May 1970 and became an instant success and the rest, as they say, is history. Well, not quite. Since the album’s release, the conspiracy theorists have been busy trying to find evidence of a cover-up.

It was widely rumoured that some of the album did actually feature material recorded at the Hull gig and some believe that the album was in reality all recorded there, with the record company thinking that ‘Live At Leeds’ would be more marketable than ‘Live At Hull’.
To add insult to injury, The Who returned to Leeds University in June 2006 to replicate that famous night.

5The Who’s band career has always been more of a soap opera at times and sadly two of the original line-up were casualties of their own success. Keith Moon died in 1978 from an accidental overdose of medication prescribed to prevent seizures brought on by his withdrawal from alcohol. John Entwistle died of an alleged drug-induced heart attack on the eve of the band’s US tour in 2002 in his room at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas.

There is little doubt in the minds of all those who were at Hull City Hall on that February night in 1970 that they were robbed of the opportunity to have been part of a great milestone being achieved in the recording industry.

6The album was a huge success and received critical acclaim. It helped to put Leeds on the music map and left Hull out on a limb, which was not unusual at that time.

For The Who the year 2009 will mark the 40th anniversary of the release of Tommy and a year later Live At Leeds will reach the same milestone. It has been well-documented that the Hull City Hall gig was considered to be the better of the two used for recording the live album and only a ‘technical hitch’ deprived the city of its place in musical history.

7Well, a lot of water has flowed past the city in the Humber since 1970, but to the fans who were there at the City Hall that night, Live At Leeds should always have been Live At Hull.

However, like the thousands of other fans who turned out that night, on 16th February 1970, to see The Who, I can proudly say ‘I was there’.

As for the true story behind the making of the Live At Leeds album, I guess if you asked Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend about it today, the obvious response would be ‘I can’t explain’.

December 23, 2013 Posted by | The Who Live At Hull 1970 | | Leave a comment

The Who Live At Hull 1970

Who Live at HullFrom amazon.co.uk

Review This Hull CD is absolutely essential but, please, read on as I explain why. There are a number of very subtle differences between this and the Leeds set, and, perhaps, the most notable is Keith Moon and where he sits in the sound mix here. Keith Moon is certainly dominant throughout the entire set, and his drums are `placed’ very high in the mix resulting in a thundering and very relentless attack which brilliantly drives all the songs here.

Pete Townshend is very clean and his pick-ups (which I assume are his P90’s on his SG) are brighter than ever. On the Leeds set you hear Pete’s guitar very fuzzed out and distorted (even with reverb!), and the Hull set offers a nice clean contrast in places, while other places offer a more rounded smoother overdrive than Leeds. The `presence’ and `closeness’ of just Keith Moons drums and Pete Townshends guitar are enough to place you center stage in a way Leeds does not.

As for the bass, John Entwistle’s playing is as strong as ever, and the over-dubs on the first few tracks are not exposed by the rest of the set – the tone, timing, and volume are all consistent from start to finish and any overdubs are actually undetectable (don’t worry!). And Roger Daltrey’s vocals are absolutely flawless; very powerful, very touching, and very admirable.

Whilst this set is no-where near as `polished’ as Leeds, it does offer an invaluable insight into how the band would have sounded on stage at that time – Leeds has always felt too `done’ in my opinion, and the sound, when compared to Hull, is like comparing a studio recording with a live recording; Hull feels realer, truer, and more alive! The Hull CD gives great tribute to Keith Moon and Pete Townshend in particular, and Moon’s playing is more daring, adventurous, and spontaneous (with fills unimaginably tight), and Towhshend cranking solo’s demonstrate how diverse his playing is – what a great lead and rhythm guitarist!

After first purchasing `Live at Leeds’ in 2001 (at the age of 11) and playing it extensively over the last 11 years, I can conclude that Hull may be the rawer, truer, and superior set to Leeds. Overall, I’d highly recommend this CD set and, having been a strong fan of The Who for years, would rate it as highly as Who’s Next, Isle Of Wight 1970, and Quadrophenia.

Review I’ve become quite slack with all things Who in the last few years, so when Ii first saw the pre-order for this I thought it was going to be disappointing, but knowing what we know about Live At Leeds and its relationship to Hull, it really isn’t.

The first thing that strikes me about this set, is that it is impossible to listen to it and not compare every second to the same moments of LAL. That classic album has had many permutations over the last 40 years, but in my opinion, the original 6 track version still kicks like a mule. I discovered it from a Kerrang 100 albums you must own list from about 1989/1990, and could. not. believe. it. when i first heard it. So LAH has a lot of listening history to live up to.

There is a lot less banter on LAH, whether this is by design or not i don’t know, but it does detract a bit from the perceived intimacy of LAL. However, the other differences are striking. Moon’s drumming is, unbelievably, even more incendiary on LAH. It could be the fact that the mix is slightly different, but he just seems to be on fire. The songs are punchier, and although timings are similar, they seem shorter and more direct. The singing isn’t as good, but The Who live was never about perfection. It is fascinating to hear the differences in Townshend’s playing, and the surprising lack of repetition between the two sets. The production also seems to ramp up The Ox’s playing, and on Young Man Blues his bass growls like I’ve never heard before.

One minute complaint, the inside sleeve of the 2cd set has a photo of Leeds, from the rejected set that Chris McCourt did. Weird. Maybe there aren’t any of Hull.

This is an essential set. Buy it. Turn it up. And for you experienced listeners, maybe feel a tiny bit of the excitement you felt the first time you heard Live At Leeds.

Review Recorded the night after Live At Leeds, this is another great live performance – in fact not that different from its legendary predecessor. The mighty version of Magic Bus isn’t repeated but the rest is – the great versions of Summertime Blues, Shakin’ All Over and Young Man Blues especially. They’re just as good, as is the rest. It’s a proper live album rather than the modern, auto-tuned and otherwise airbrushed and adulterated stuff we’re often served up.

Daltrey produces some spine-tingling moments but also strains for some notes and suffers from some dodgy tuning sometimes (as do the backing vocals.) Towshend’s guitar wanders out of tune sometimes, and there are some moments of near-shambles mixed in with some sheer brilliance. It’s real music being played by real people and, warts and all, is a terrific reminder of what a superb guitarist Townshend is under the antics and destruction, and that Keith Moon may have been madder than an exceptionally mad person on National Mad Day, but behind a drum kit he was a unique genius.

Every Who fan will want this. Of course we will; as a self-respecting Who fan, I bought Live At Leeds when it came out and still have the vinyl album – bits and pieces and all – and then the expanded CD versions and I had to have this, too. I’m not sure that this adds anything to Live at Leeds, really, but – come on – we’re going to buy a live album recorded the night after that historic concert no matter what. If you’re a Who fan, you’ll love it – but then, you already knew that.

(What follows is a personal reflection which you may not want to bother with. The thing is, although Live At Leeds a great live album – possibly the greatest in rock – I’ve not played it in the intervening 40-odd years nearly as much as Tommy, Who’s Next, Quadrophenia and the rest. There are some great moments but I often find with live albums that you really had to be there, and I wasn’t – I was at home a few miles away studying for my O Levels. I saw The Who in concert only once (at Charlton Athletic’s Valley ground in 1974, since you ask) and it was a stunning experience.

Daltrey shone like a rebellious god with his golden curls, Townshend windmilled and leapt like a demon, Moon was…well, Keith Moon, and Entwhistle stood like a rock amid it all while I was among tens of thousands of people, all swept away by the music we loved being played just for us, right there and right then, by the men we so admired. Almost four decades on, I still remember it with a thrill. And that’s the thing: a recording of it would probably be very good, but it wouldn’t be the occasion, and that’s what I find with live albums generally. I’m often glad to have heard them but don’t go back to them that often.

I suspect it will be like that with Live At Hull, too, but then – so what? I’ve got to have it so I know it’s there in my collection.

April 17, 2013 Posted by | The Who Live At Hull 1970 | | Leave a comment

The Who Live At Hull 1970

imagesCAOSK12WFrom thefirenote.blogspot.co.uk

Originally released as part of the Deluxe Edition of Live at Leeds in 2010, The Who-Live at Hull 1970, has finally been given its own standalone release! Recorded the night after Leeds, February 15th 1970, the Hull show stands on its own as a powerful testament to the ferocity of the Who at the absolute peak of their powers.

In fact, if Hull had been released instead of Leeds, this would easily be considered one of the finest live albums of its era. However, due to problems with the recordings, this was never going to happen. John Entwhistle’s bass tracks were somehow not recorded on the first six songs of the night. Thankfully due to the fact that the setlist was virtually the same, and the performances were nearly identical, using modern technology, the producer was able to “airlift” in his bass tracks from the night before, and mesh them perfectly with the rest of the tracks. I never would have known this if it wasn’t in the liner notes, it sounds perfect.

I’m not going to dissect the music too much, odds are good if you’ve gotten this far, you know the songs and are familiar with Live at Leeds enough to be curious about this new Live at Hull. Instead, I want to talk about what makes this different and nearly as essential as Leeds, and why you need it.

The most startling difference between Hull and Leeds is the drum work of the late great Keith Moon. For me personally, his drumming was always the highlight of Leeds. He is up front and center in the mix once again, almost as the lead instrument. What’s really interesting is that the fills he plays are completely different than they were only the night before. He is all over his kit, and at points you can hear his sticks hitting the mics as he is going ballistic. For me, the differences in Moon’s playing alone make this worth owning.

The energy of the crowd is different, they are a bit more low key, and though it doesn’t affect The Who’s playing, it does affect their between song banter. They move from song to song without much dialogue. It’s BAM BAM BAM, hit after hit, whereas on Leeds, Pete Townshend was very talkative with the crowd.

There are two big differences on disc one musically, first, the band didn’t end the set with “Magic Bus”, which by all accounts was rarely played, so many think it was a reward to the wild crowd at Leeds, and two, “Shakin’ All Over” breaks down into the classic blues jam, Spoonful, in the middle, before coming back at the end. Other than that, the highlights are the same, a smoking version of “A Quick One While He’s Away”, The hit trio of “Substitute”, “Happy Jack”, and “I’m a Boy”, and the smoking 16 minute version of “My Generation”. All of disc two is devoted to a live rendition of Tommy. Tommy is where Roger Daltry’s pipes really shine. His voice is in excellent form here, and this is really his showcase.

If you’re as big a fan of that album as I am, you need to hear this. It’s remarkable that these four guys can pull off a piece this complex in a rock concert setting and not lose any of the energy of their live show. They really nail it, particularly with “Overture”, “Amazing Journey”, “Sparks” and “We’re Not Gonna Take It”.

This is a great sounding live album, every bit the equal to Leeds in fidelity, and far superior to the Isle of Wight performance from later in the year in every way imaginable. I can’t recommend this album enough, to both diehard Who fans who are already familiar with this material, and particularly to newcomers, who really have no idea of the transcendent rock experience this set has to offer. Go check this out now!

February 28, 2013 Posted by | The Who Live At Hull 1970 | | 1 Comment

The Who Live At Hull 1970

imagesCAOSK12WFrom rockguitardaily.blogspot.co.uk

Pete Townshend never quite gets his due – maybe because for whatever complicated reasons, he often comes across as an unmitigated ass. I get it, believe me, there have been times when I wanted to hate everything he did, just because he came off as such an insufferable twat. However. He’s also as great an artist as rock has known.

Live At Hull 1970 is the long lost and unloved sibling of Live At Leeds, but while both have their benefits, I am here to tell you that this is one of the best live documents I’ve ever heard. Keith Moon sounds like God’s drummer on this record (which Pete may interpret as a demotion) and Townshend’s guitar tracks are sublime – if there is a better guitar tone primer than that of the second disc (the Tommy set), I’ve never heard it. Moon’s drums sound perfect, but more importantly, his performance is transcendent – truly one of rock’s greatest.

Much has been made of the fact that the bass tracks for the first four songs were lost and replaced by Leeds tracks, but if you didn’t know, you’d never know, and while I wish I hadn’t been told this, it really doesn’t matter. Again, the real point is that this is an amazing live set from one of the best rock band’s in history, and a must own by any measure.

By 1970, The Who were a fearless live band, brave enough to kick off their shows with a song sung by their bassist, and Heaven and Hell is far from a commercial tune. It is, however, brash, brilliant, and a fiery set starter. Can’t Explain follows and this is a Townshend/Moon manifesto. A close listen will reveal that the rhythmic flourishes provided by the two are why every cover of this classic comes across as dull and lifeless. Entwistle’s bass is exceptional as always, regardless of where it came from, and Roger Daltrey is a singer who’s greatness is so well known that sometimes we take him for granted.

Fortune Teller is another deep catalogue favorite, and with it’s staccato rhythms and Beatles-esque harmonies it’s another brave choice for early in the set. Pete switches gears rapidly, going from pristinely clean arpeggios to slamming power chords, and back again. Tattoo was forty years ahead of its time, explaining tattoo culture way ahead of its later arrival. The sophistication of the band is incredibly evident, and they segue from pop to proto-metal without a blink. One of my favorite Who tunes.

Young Man Blues, and Substitute slam past brilliantly like freight trains, and then it’s Happy Jack – one of rock’s great moments and the only difficulty is for me to figure out which band member is shining most brilliantly. It’s a toss up, but Moon? Holy hell, this set is the best Moon I’ve ever heard. Same with I’m A Boy – simple pop tune? Nope. Brilliantly written, conceived and performed rock miracle? Yup.

A Quick One, While He’s Away is more sheer Townshend brilliance, and his guitar playing and sound are magnificent. By now Townshend had shed any desire to be an R&B/pop hitmaker, and he’s into intricate operettas. I hate to beat a dead drum, but Moon is again beyond friggin’ fabulous, and Entwistle’s loping basslines create the perfect pad from which to launch Pete’s awesome strumming. Pete’s as good a rhythm player as Keith and John Lennon – cool thing is they all play completely differently. What was in the English water supply post WWII?

Muscular rock closes out CD one with Summertime Blues, Shakin’ All Over, and one of the greatest 15 minutes of sheer rock bliss I’ve ever heard, a truly mind bending My Generation that stops and visits See Me, Feel Me, and a few other Tommy reprisals, before Pete Townshend goes off on a guitar tangent that in my estimable opinion should sit next to Hendrix’s Machine Gun as an archetypal rock performance – this track is easily worth the price of the set, and every person who loves rock should own this. It’s actually the final track of the night, and I wish they had stayed chronologically correct here. It is maybe the ultimate set closer, maybe even more so than the set closing Magic Bus from Leeds.

CD 2 is the whole of Tommy, and for my money, this is the only version to which I shall most likely ever again listen. Townshend’s genius is presented in preposterously large fashion – strummed, picked, sang, and slung across the stage in a fashion never repeated by any guitarist. I don’t know that any rock guitarist ever had a better hour. The range of his repertoire is what is commonly called, a vocabulary. The dynamic expanse of his emotional and sophisticated composition is astounding. I wish I could give this to you as an assignment, just to make sure you understand just how great rock can be. I don’t mean to sound condescending, or authoritarian, but this is just so damned powerful, and good.

Like I said at the beginning, Townshend sometimes doesn’t get his due, but this sure makes the case. He is as great a musician as we have known – a masterful writer, player, singer, and a practically unparalleled conceptualist, who just happened to be in a band with three other gentlemen who were as good as any at their jobs.

Live At Hull 1970 is a tremendous addition to The Who’s catalogue, and even if you own, love, and swear on Live At Leeds, this is equally essential, and again, for my money, I’ve never heard Moon and Townshend better in sheer sonic terms.

February 28, 2013 Posted by | The Who Live At Hull 1970 | | Leave a comment

The Who Live At Hull 1970

imagesCAOSK12WFrom blogcritics.org

Between Pete Townshend’s book, the upcoming Quadrophenia tour, and a flood of reissues and otherwise newly unearthed material this year, 2012 has become something of a goldmine for fans of The Who.

Live At Hull 1970 joins a long list of new Who releases that includes the recent Live In Texas ’75 DVD and an upcoming boxed set of all the band’s studio albums.

But this release stands apart from the others – not only because it captures The Who during what most acknowledge was their peak period as a live concert act – but also because it was recorded the night after the legendary Live At Leeds show.

Regarded by many as the greatest live rock and roll album ever made, The Who Live At Leeds is, if nothing else, going to be a tough act to follow, even by the same band who created it. Live At Hull 1970 is a worthy, if non-essential, companion piece to that classic.

As the story goes, both performances were recorded for the planned live album, but the Hull tapes were either lost or deemed unworthy of release. There are even rumors that some of John Entwistle’s bass parts heard here, actually came from the Live At Leeds recording, and were duplicated in later studio overdubs for this album.

The main thing you notice about Live At Hull 1970 though – particularly if you own the deluxe version of Live At Leeds released decades after the original single disc album – is that the setlists from the two performances are nearly identical. The biggest difference on Hull is the omission of “Magic Bus,” which was a standout on the original Live At Leeds album. That one is sorely missed on Live At Hull 1970.

But there are other noticeable differences between the two. The version of “Shakin’ All Over” here includes parts of “Spoonful” in the middle, which are missing from the Leeds recording. The blazing, fifteen minute version of “My Generation” heard here is also – incredibly – even more ferociously played than the one heard on Leeds. Townshend simply takes his slash and burn power chording to another level here, and Entwistle and Keith Moon don’t miss a single beat in matching the ensuing pyro note for chaotic note.

Like the deluxe version of Live At Leeds, the second disc here is devoted entirely to a complete run-through of the rock opera Tommy. As was the case there, Tommy takes on a much edgier, rock sound live than on the studio album. Keith Moon is also nothing short of astonishing here. On the extended instrumental parts like “Sparks” and the “Overture,” he pounds the crap out of his drums like a wildman.

That said, making comparisons between these two performances from back-to-back nights, though perhaps a bit unfair, is also inevitable. Mostly, they are so slight as to be almost non-existent. But hardcore Who nerds will certainly notice the differences in recording quality. Those weird little clicks you hear between some of the tracks for one thing. Those are actually the sound of Keith Moon’s sticks hitting the rims of his drums.

If The Who Live At Leeds is considered by many to be the greatest live rock and roll record of all time, the performance here is so close that you could almost mount a decent argument for Live At Hull 1970 as a strong contender for the number two spot. That’s how close these two recordings sound.

Some fans will also argue that Live At Hull is the better performance, due to its rarer, more obscure status compared to the much more celebrated Live At Leeds. But it’s basically the same show.

February 23, 2013 Posted by | The Who Live At Hull 1970 | | Leave a comment